IELTS SYLLABUS 2015 PDF

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IELTS Syllabus - The IELTS conducting bodies, namely British Council, IDP and Cambridge Assessment English prescribe the respective syllabus of. Format: PDF download. Three downloadable mock test papers of the IELTS reading test; includes model answers. Listening. Starting out. Description. Listening sample 1 task - Form completion (PDF, 59KB). IELTS listening recording 1 (MP3, MB). Listening sample 2 task – Multiple Choice (PDF, 16KB ).


Ielts Syllabus 2015 Pdf

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There are two types of IELTS: Academic and General Training. Listening and Speaking are the same for both tests, but the subject matter of the Reading and. IELTS Life Skills. A1 Speaking and Listening. Sample Test A. This test should not exceed 18 minutes. Please note: With the exception of the Task Sheet in Phase. free pdf ielts downloads printable word doc ielts writing speech listening task 1 2 (June syllabus), plus extra Reading and Writing modules for General. Training candidates. The book following diseases by A. Malaria.

All test takers take the same Listening and Speaking tests, while the Reading and Writing tests differ depending on whether the test taker is taking the Academic or General Training versions of the test. Listening[ edit ] The module comprises four sections, with ten questions in each section.

Section 1 has a conversation between two speakers for example, a conversation about travel arrangements Section 2 has one person speaking for example, a speech about local facilities. Sections 3 and 4 are about educational and training situations Section 3 is a conversation between two main speakers for example, a discussion between two university students, perhaps guided by a tutor Section 4 has one person speaking about an academic subject.

Then they have some time to look through the questions. The questions are in the same order as the information in the recording, so the answer to the first question will be before the answer to the second question, and so on.

Each section is heard only once. At the end of the test students are given 10 minutes to transfer their answers to an answer sheet. Test takers should be careful when writing down their answers as they will lose marks for incorrect spelling and grammar. Texts in IELTS Academic Three reading texts, which come from books, journals, magazines, newspapers and online resources written for non-specialist audiences.

All the topics are of general interest to students at undergraduate or postgraduate level. For example, timetables or notices — things a person would need to understand when living in an English-speaking country.

Section 2 contains two texts, which deal with work. For example, job descriptions, contracts, training materials. Section 3 contains one long text about a topic of general interest. The text is generally descriptive, longer and more complex than the texts in Sections 1 and 2. The text will be taken from a newspaper, magazine, book or online resource.

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In task 1 test takers write at least words in about 20 minutes. In task 2 test takers write at least words in about 40 minutes. Test takers will be penalised if their answer is too short or does not relate to the topic. Answers should be written in full sentences test takers must not use notes or bullet points.

Task focus Multiple choice tests a wide range of reading skills, including detailed understanding of specific points or an overall understanding of the main points of the text.

It can thus be used with more factual texts. Unlike task type 5, Matching headings, it is concerned with specific information rather than with the main idea.

A heading will refer to the main idea of the paragraph or section of the text.

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Test takers must match the heading to the correct paragraphs or sections, which are marked alphabetically. Test takers write the appropriate Roman numerals in the boxes on their answer sheets. There will always be more headings than there are paragraphs or sections, so that some headings will not be used. It is also possible that some paragraphs or sections may not be included in the task. One or more paragraphs or sections may already be matched with a heading as an example for test takers.

This task type is used with texts that contain paragraphs or sections with clearly defined themes. The options are a group of features from the text, and are identified by letters. Test takers may, for example, be required to match different research findings to a list of researchers, or characteristics to age groups, events to historical periods, etc.

It is possible that some options will not be used, and that others may be used more than once.

The instructions will inform test takers if options may be used more than once. It may be used both with factual information, as well as opinion-based discursive texts.

Test takers need to be able to skim and scan the text in order to locate the required information and to read for detail. They will have more options to choose from than there are questions. Test takers must write the letter they have chosen on the answer sheet. They must write their answers on the answer sheet. In the variations involving a summary or notes, test takers need to be aware of the type of word s that will fit into a given gap for example, whether a noun is needed, or a verb, etc.

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IELTS General Training test - this includes extracts from books, magazines, newspapers, notices, advertisements, company handbooks and guidelines. These are materials you are likely to encounter on a daily basis in an English-speaking environment. Section 1 may contain two or three short texts or several shorter texts. Section 2 comprises two texts. In Section 3, there is one long text. Task focus This task type tests a wide range of reading skills including detailed understanding of specific points or an overall understanding of the main points of the text.

Task focus This task type assesses the test takers' ability to recognise particular points of information conveyed in the text. They may be asked to find; specific details, an example, a reason, a description, a comparison, a summary, an explanation. When this is the case, test takers will be told that they can use any letter more than once. The questions do not follow the same order as the information in the text. This task type can be used with any text as it may test a wide range of reading skills, from locating detail to recognising a summary or definition.

Unlike task type 5 Matching headings , it is concerned with specific information rather than with the main idea. They must match the heading to the correct paragraphs or sections, which are marked alphabetically, and write the appropriate Roman numerals in the boxes on their answer sheets. There will always be more headings than there are paragraphs or sections, so some headings will not be used. One or more paragraphs or sections may already be matched with a heading as an example.

No heading may be used more than once. Task focus This task tests the ability to recognise the main idea or theme in the paragraphs or sections of a text, and to distinguish main ideas from supporting ones.

These are a group of features from the text, and are identified by letters. Test takers may, for example, be required to match different characteristics to age groups or events to historical periods, etc.

The instructions will advise whether options may be used more than once. Task focus This task assesses the ability to recognise relationships and connections between facts in the text, and to recognise opinions and theories. It may be used both with texts dealing with factual information, description or narrative. Note that the summary will usually be of only one part of the passage rather than the whole.

The given information may be in the form of; several connected sentences referred to as a summary , several notes referred to as notes , a table with some of its cells empty or partially empty referred to as a table , a series of boxes or steps linked by arrows to show a sequence of events, with some of the boxes or steps empty or partially empty referred to as a flow-chart.

Where a list of answers is provided, they most frequently consist of a single word, There are always more words or phrases in the box than there are gaps to fill.

In the variations involving a summary or notes, they need to be aware of the type of word s that will fit into a given gap for example, whether a noun is needed, or a verb, etc.

Task focus This task type assesses the ability to understand a detailed description, and to relate it to information presented in the form of a diagram. Test format — Academic Writing 60 minutes Topics are of general interest to, and suitable for, test takers entering undergraduate and postgraduate studies or seeking professional registration.

There are two tasks: Task 1 - you will be presented with a graph, table, chart or diagram and asked to describe, summarise or explain the information in your own words. You may be asked to describe and explain data, describe the stages of a process, how something works or describe an object or event. Task 2 - you will be asked to write an essay in response to a point of view, argument or problem.

Responses to both tasks must be in a formal style. They need to write words in about 20 minutes. In Task 2, they respond to a point of view or argument or problem. They need to write words in about 40 minutes. Answering Answers must be given on the answer sheet and must be written in full.

Notes or bullet points are not acceptable as answers. Test takers may write on the question paper but this cannot be taken from the examination room and will not be seen by the examiner. Task 1 Task type and format In Writing Task 1, test takers may be asked to describe facts or figures presented in one or more graphs, charts or tables on a related topic; or they may be given a diagram of a machine, a device or a process and asked to explain how it works.

Test takers must write their answers on the answer booklet. Task focus This task assesses the ability to identify the most important and relevant information and trends in a graph, chart, table or diagram, and to give a well-organised overview of it using language accurately in an academic style.

They must write their answers on the answer booklet. Task focus This task assesses the ability to present a clear, relevant, well-organised argument, giving evidence or examples to support ideas and use language accurately.

Task achievement Coherence and cohesion Lexical resource Grammatical range and accuracy. Test format — General Training Writing 60 minutes Topics are of general interest. Task 1 - you will be presented with a situation and asked to write a letter requesting information, or explaining the situation. The letter may be personal, semi-formal or formal in style. The essay can be fairly personal in style.

Answering Answers must be written in full in the answer booklet. Notes or bullet points in whole or in part are not acceptable as answers. Test takers may write on the question paper but this cannot be taken from the test room and will not be seen by the examiner.

Task 1 Task type and format In Writing Task 1, test takers are presented with a situation and required to write a personal response in the form of an informal, semi-formal or formal letter of at least words in the answer booklet provided.

Task focus This task assesses the ability to follow English letter-writing conventions i. Task focus This task assesses the ability to follow English discursive writing conventions i. Task 1 responses are assessed on: Task 2 responses are assessed on: Task response Coherence and cohesion Lexical resource Grammatical range and accuracy. Performance descriptors Task 1 Task achievement This assesses how appropriately, accurately and relevantly the response fulfils the requirements set out in the task, using the minimum of words.

Part 1 - the examiner will ask you general questions about yourself and a range of familiar topics, such as home, family, work, studies and interests.

This part lasts between four and five minutes. You will have one minute to prepare before speaking for up to two minutes. The examiner will then ask one or two questions on the same topic. Part 3 - you will be asked further questions about the topic in Part 2. These will give you the opportunity to discuss more abstract ideas and issues.

This part of the test lasts between four and five minutes. All Speaking tests are recorded. Timing 11—14 minutes Task types There are three parts to the test and each part fulfils a specific function in terms of interaction pattern, task input and test takers output.

Part 1 lasts for 4—5 minutes. Task focus This part of the test focuses on the ability to communicate opinions and information on everyday topics and common experiences or situations by answering a range of questions. Part 2 lasts 3—4 minutes, including the preparation time. Task focus This part of the test focuses on the ability to speak at length on a given topic without further prompts from the examiner , using appropriate language and organising ideas coherently.

It is likely that the test takers will need to draw on their own experience to complete the long turn. Part 3 lasts 4—5 minutes. Task focus This part of the test focuses on the ability to express and justify opinions and to analyse, discuss and speculate about issues. A variety of question types are used, chosen from the following: Test takers write their answers on the question paper as they listen and at the end of the test are given 10 minutes to transfer their answers to an answer sheet.

Multiple choice questions are used to test a wide range of skills.

Test format

Test takers are required to match a numbered list of items from the listening text to a set of options on the question paper.

Matching assesses the skill of listening for detail and whether a test taker can understand information given in a conversation on an everyday topic, such as the different types of hotel or guest house accommodation.

Test takers are required to complete labels on a plan eg of a building , map eg of part of a town or diagram e. This type of task assesses the ability to understand, for example, a description of a place, and to relate this to a visual representation. This focuses on the main points which a listener would naturally record in this type of situation.

Sentence completion focuses on the ability to identify the key information in a listening text. Test takers are required to read a question and then write a short answer using information from the listening text. Sentence completion focuses on the ability to listen for concrete facts, such as places, prices or times, within the listening text.

Texts are taken from books, journals, magazines and newspapers, and have been written for a non-specialist audience. Test takers are required to transfer their answers to an answer sheet during the time allowed for the test. The General Training version is for test takers who want to work, train, study at a secondary school or migrate to an English-speaking country.

All other features, such as timing allocation, length of written responses and reporting of scores, are the same. It is conducted in the form of a one-to-one interview with an examiner. The examiner assesses the test taker as he or she is speaking.

The speaking session is also recorded for monitoring and for re-marking in case of an appeal against the score given. A variety of accents and writing styles have been presented in test materials in order to minimise linguistic bias. Band scores are used for each language sub-skill Listening, Reading, Writing, and Speaking. IELTS General Training is intended for those planning to undertake non-academic training or to gain work experience , or for immigration purposes.

The Speaking test may be taken on the same day or up to seven days before or after the other tests. All test takers take the same Listening and Speaking tests, while the Reading and Writing tests differ depending on whether the test taker is taking the Academic or General Training versions of the test. Listening[ edit ] The module comprises four sections, with ten questions in each section.

Section 1 has a conversation between two speakers for example, a conversation about travel arrangements Section 2 has one person speaking for example, a speech about local facilities.

Sections 3 and 4 are about educational and training situations Section 3 is a conversation between two main speakers for example, a discussion between two university students, perhaps guided by a tutor Section 4 has one person speaking about an academic subject. Then they have some time to look through the questions. The questions are in the same order as the information in the recording, so the answer to the first question will be before the answer to the second question, and so on. Each section is heard only once.

At the end of the test students are given 10 minutes to transfer their answers to an answer sheet. Test takers should be careful when writing down their answers as they will lose marks for incorrect spelling and grammar. Texts in IELTS Academic Three reading texts, which come from books, journals, magazines, newspapers and online resources written for non-specialist audiences. All the topics are of general interest to students at undergraduate or postgraduate level.

For example, timetables or notices — things a person would need to understand when living in an English-speaking country.Supplementary material: OI WB pp. Test takers are required to read a set of sentences summarising key information from all the listening text or from one part of it. Test takers will be given a number of statements and asked: Students need to understand that any knowledge they bring with them from outside the passage should not play a part when deciding on their answers.

The Speaking test consists of an oral interview between the test takers' and an examiner. Therefore, test takers who fail to attempt to answer this task will greatly reduce their chance of achieving a good band. Sophie Leia Zhghenti. Has great difficulty understanding spoken and written English.

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